Brain Health in Your 70’s
Nutrition & Aging

We all want to stay sharp and focused as we age. In your 70’s it’smore important than ever to take active measures to protect your brain health.

Losing or misplacing things every now and then or missing a monthly payment can happen to anyone, but forgetfulness may become more common in your 70’s.

Here’s the good news: Cognitive decline is not inevitable with age. Your genes are not necessarily your destiny. There are things you can do to take charge of your brain health, including staying physically active, keeping your mind stimulated with mental, physical and social activities, and nourishing your brain with targeted daily brain health nutrients or a supplement like CogGevity™ Advanced Brain Nutrition.

More good news: Around one in three participants of an eight-year-long study sailed through their 70’s and into their 80’s with no decline in cognitive function.1,2

How Your Brain Changes Over Time

Studies have shown that,as we age,brain volume declines at a rate of around 5% per decade after age 40.3 In some people, but not all, this decline increases after age 70.3Problem-solving, recall, and visual perceptual abilities (particularly spatial reasoning) can also decline with age, and cognitive slowing—delays in our ability to process information—also becomes more common.

On the plus side,several important cognitive abilities remain strong over time and change little with age, including language, vocabulary, and well-practiced skills (like arithmetic).

Older people also tend to remember positive images more than negative ones, which may in part explain the cheerful disposition of so many seniors!

Intuition also remains strong in your 70’s—one study found that older adults did just as well as those under age 30 when it came to intuitive decision making.4

Keep your mind sharp in your 70’s by:

  • Eating a healthy diet
  • Exercising regularly
  • Taking daily targeted brain health nutrients or supplements
  • Getting your hearing checked—hearing loss can interfere with conversation and your ability to remember new information, which may diminish cognitive ability over time5
  • Stimulating your mind with games, new learning (e.g., a new language or musical instrument) and social activities
  • Getting enough quality sleep

Age Well. Live Well. CogGevity(R)Advanced Brain Nutrition.

Developed by a world-class team of neuroscientists and neurosurgeons, CogGevity(R) Advanced Brain Nutrition is a daily brain health supplement formulated with six proven ingredients known to benefit the brain. The ingredients in CogGevityare safe, well-known, and thoroughly vetted.

The patented formula includes:

  • Longvida® Optimized Curcumin+: A substance found in turmeric, curcumin has been shown in studies to have antioxidant, phytochemical, and anti-inflammatory properties.*CogGevity contains a highly-bioavailable form of curcumin that is absorbed more readily into the bloodstream.
  • EPA & DHA: Essential omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA support healthy neurotransmitter function, help maintain brain volume, and deter toxic protein accumulation in the brain.*
  • Decaffeinated Green Tea Extract: Green tea extract contains powerful antioxidants that have neuroprotective effects and deter protein toxicity in the brain.*
  • Fisetin: A flavonoid (plant chemical) compound naturally found in fruits and vegetables, fisetin contains anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that help minimize oxidative stress.*
  • Vitamin D: An essential nutrient, Vitamin D works with EPA & DHA to support cognitive function, boost mood, and support the immune system.*

These Statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

+ Longvida ((US Pat 9192644, EU Pat 1993365) is a registered trademark of Verdure Sciences, Inc. All Rights Reserved © 2017 Verdure Sciences.

    Sources:
  • 1. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090608162424.htm
  • 2. http://n.neurology.org/content/74/16/1296
  • 3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2596698/
  • 4. https://projects.ncsu.edu/psychology/graduate/conc/develop/adultdevelopment/docs/research/Queen-&-Hess-(2010).pdf
  • 5. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/802291